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Posts Tagged ‘summer’

Pickling Cukes!

The Farm is a-buzz with visions of pickles, and the time is now for making them.  Pickling cukes are crawling out of their beds and into the rows, lending their spiny green skins to harvesting hands, revealing cool cucumbery flesh…  but more so they are ready for pickling!

Did you know? Pickles are loaded with Vitamin K, Vitamin C, Potassium, and are a good source of dietary fiber (the skins!).  The combination of hydrating flesh with fibery skins containing silica, K , Magnesium and other minerals make for an awesome, and nutritious snack.

Mmm, Mmm.  Pickles, gherkins, baby dills.  In a sandwich, on a stick, or by the jar full!  These days a majority of pickles are store bought and available in countless vinegar-based varieties.  You may have tried your hand at preserving your own or had a generous friend pass on a home-canned jar.  Ever had a sour or brined pickle?  I remember a kosher deli in the neighbourhood I grew up in, I’d order a bowl of soup, and most of all enjoy the never ending bowl of  brined pickles and beets on the counter – YUM!  Fermented pickles are easy to make and offer the additional benefits of fermented foods – contributing to a healthy digestive system for starters.

This week the farm has two opportunities for you to engage with Pickling Cukes!  Come on over to the Saturday market for pickling cukes, fresh garlic and herbs, in addition to the many other farm fresh offerings.  Extra special this week is a free Fermentation Demonstration at the Saturday market!  Explore further with the popular Food Preservation by Fermentation workshop on the evening of August 17th.  Join Chef Andrea Potter as she guides participants to create cucumber pickles, sauerkraut, and demonstrate kimchi making (check out the previous blog post about  Growing Seasons workshops or http://fermentaugust2011.eventbrite.com/ to register).

To avoid finding yourself in a pickle, come learn how to make your own – see you at the farm!

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Growing Season Workshops!

 

Three Sisters in the Kitchen: A traditional Maya cooking class.

 

Join members of the UBC Farm Maya in Exile Garden for an interactive traditional cooking workshop on August 13th, 2011 from 2pm-4pm. Learn some of the medicinal and culinary uses of various herbs and vegetables grown in their garden. In this workshop, participants will have a chance to make three dishes using amaranth (bledo), yerba mora and squash blossoms. Try your hand at making fresh tortillas, and enjoy the garden-fresh dishes you prepare! If time permits, participants will have a chance to visit the Maya Garden at the UBC Farm. For more information and to register click here!


Date: Saturday August 13th,  2pm-4pm

Cost: $30 (+ $1.74 registration fee)

 

Food Preservation by Fermentation!

This popular class is an introduction to the world of fermented vegetables.

Fermenting foods is an ancient method of preserving the harvest. Rich in probiotics and enzymes for improving digestion, these raw foods are re-gaining their popularity. Reclaim this skill and learn how to make sauerkraut, kimchi and brined pickles at home. We will be making: Cucumber pickles featuring UBC Farm’s own pickling cucs! A batch of sauerkraut for you to take home and start fermenting right away. A demonstration of making kimchi is included. And of course a pickle tasting platter! For more information and to register click here!

Date: Wednesday August 17th, 6pm-9pm

Cost: $50 (+ 2.24 registration fee)

For more information check out the registration links above.

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We had our first big Friday harvest today in preparation for our farm gate sale. Ever wonder what it takes to get all that farm-fresh produce ready for market? Check it out!

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My last one! It’s been a joy to bring you photos each week, and I will miss it very much. However Halifax calls, and I must answer. Amy will be rocking the blog though, so I leave you in good hands. Enjoy these farewell shots of a gorgeous day.

Many good farm wishes,

Ayla

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Today was the first market of the season…good timing considering that the strawberries were harvested for the first time on Thursday!! This was also the first market for a number of Farm Staff, Market Crew volunteers, and Sowing Seeds Farm Apprentices. With team work and guidance from more experienced folks, it came off as a resounding success for all involved!!

Getting Ready...

Getting Ready...

Tents were quickly pitched and humble Rubbermaid produce tubs yielded luscious displays of colour and texture at the market tables. Fresh radishes and strawberries practically glowed, while the garlic scapes, mizuna, mustard, arugula, and spinach looked good enough to, well, eat! Eggs were carefully stacked, and aromas from freshly-cut mint, sage, oregano, and winter savoury wafted temptingly around, as buckets of towering foxgloves bobbed above heads on their way to the flower table.

Almost time to open!

Almost time...

Here come the foxgloves!!

Here comes the foxglove!!

Farm fresh mint harvest!

Farm fresh mint harvest!

Open for Business 2009!

Open for Business 2009!

Spirits were high among farm crew and customers alike, and nearly everyone was able to breathe deeply and enjoy the refreshing experience of finding themselves on a working farm in the middle of the city with the sun shining and the birds singing. However, peace and tranquility were definitely optional with all of the other kickoff events happening around the farm! These included a 100-Mile Pancake Breakfast presented by the 100-Mile Diet Society, a Children’s Area with farm games and activities, farm tours, live music, tool sharpening by Henk Seys (Lee Valley Tools), and bike tune ups courtesy of the UBC Bike Kitchen.

Bike Kitchen Glory

Bike Kitchen Glory

The 100-Mile Pancake Breakfast was especially exciting, since fresh food is practically always on the minds of hardworking farm staff and apprentices! By the time most of us arrived, the farm kitchen was already bustling with multiple portable burners, steam trays, and an apron-clad crew, led by Chef Ian Lai. Since the pancakes were served near the market, there was also a pancake runner, who could be seen sprinting around throughout the morning with trays of pancakes for hungry breakfast goers. The meal itself featured milk from Avalon Dairy, eggs and mint from the UBC farm, soft white wheat flour from the Flour Peddler (Agassiz), yogurt from Olympic Dairy Products Ltd., blueberry honey from James Honey Bees, and strawberries from Maan Farms. The Pancake Breakfast was not only in honour of the season’s first market, but was also celebrating the launch of the 100-Mile Diet Society’s new Foodshed Map, a collaborative piece by local writers and artists designed to educate the public about local and sustainable food systems.

The pancake factory!

The pancake factory!

Serving up 100-mile breakfast.

Serving up 100-mile breakfast.

Some of the children at the market enjoyed the farm games, while others practiced harvesting one of the UBC farm’s most plentiful and reliable crops: rocks!! (Note: the staff and apprentices are experts at this task!).  Some children also found that rolling down the hill after breakfast was the activity of choice. A few children who were past participants of the Farm Wonders Summer Camp and/or the school-based Landed Learning Program took the time to show their families around the Children’s Garden—it turns out that food knowledge can be passed up generations as well as down!

Coffee Sack Race!

Coffee Sack Race!

bean

Rocks....the most reliable perennial.

Rocks....the most reliable perennial.

As the sun rose higher in the sky, produce made its way into a variety of reusable bags and baskets, pancakes ran low, and herbs began their final journey toward the salad bowl, soup pot, or mojito. Staff, volunteers, and apprentices gradually wound down the event and looked forward to an afternoon spent in the field, encouraging growth for next Saturday’s bounty. Hope to see you there!

field

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